Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: The Perpetuation of Online Hate: A Criminological Analysis of Factors Associated with Partic...

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

Articles

The Perpetuation of Online Hate: A Criminological Analysis of Factors Associated with Participating in an Online Attack

Authors:

James Hawdon ,

Virginia Tech, US
About James
James Hawdon is a Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention at Virginia Tech. In addition to his research on online hate groups and extremism, his research focuses on how communities influence patterns of violence and the response to tragedies. He has published extensively in the areas of cybercrime, violence, the sociology of drugs, policing, media studies, and moral panics.
X close

Matthew Costello,

Arkansas State University, US
About Matthew
Dr. Matthew Costello is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Criminology and Sociology and Assistant Professor of Criminology and Sociology at Arkansas State University. His research interests include online extremism, political sociology, and collective violence. He has published in the areas of online extremism, terrorism, and Middle Eastern studies.
X close

Rebecca Barrett-Fox,

Arkansas State University, US
About Rebecca
Dr. Rebecca Barrett-Fox is an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Sociology at Arkansas State University. Her research interests include religion, sexuality, gender, politics, and hate groups. She is the author of “God Hates: Westboro Baptist Church, American Nationalism, and the Religious Right” (University Press of Kansas 2016).
X close

Colin Bernatzky

University of California, Irvine, US
About Colin
Colin Bernatzky is a graduate student at the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include political sociology, hate groups, and sociological theory.
X close

Abstract

Online extremism, or the use of information technology to profess attitudes devaluing others based on a characteristic such as race, religion, gender, or sexuality, is a growing problem. This has led to myriad harmful effects for some who are exposed to online hate. A critical first step toward stemming the tide of online hate is understanding factors associated with its creation and spread. To that end, this analysis examines factors associated with joining an ongoing attack against a targeted group online. We use insights from four leading criminological theories – routine activity theory, social control theory, general strain theory, and social learning/differential association theory - to investigate who is likely to join an attack on a targeted group when they view such an attack occurring. Using data from a national sample of 15 – 36-year-old Internet users, we conduct an ordinal logistic regression analysis. Results show support for social control theory and strain theory, as low levels of self-control and online strain are both positively correlated with joining an online attack. Similarly, we find support for the applicability of social learning theory; close engagement with online friends and groups is related to an increased likelihood of joining in online hate. Routine activity theory, however, is less relevant for understanding our outcome. Taken together, our findings shed light on factors associated with the perpetuation of online hate, and, in doing so, offer avenues for reducing its growth.
How to Cite: Hawdon, J., Costello, M., Barrett-Fox, R. and Bernatzky, C., 2019. The Perpetuation of Online Hate: A Criminological Analysis of Factors Associated with Participating in an Online Attack. Journal of Hate Studies, 15(1), pp.157–181. DOI: http://doi.org/10.33972/jhs.166
7
Views
4
Downloads
Published on 25 Sep 2019.

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)