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Ministering to Other People's Fears: Effects of Anti-Muslim Hostility on American Muslim Participation in Public Life

Author:

Caleb Elfenbein

Grinnell College, US
About Caleb
Caleb Elfenbein is Associate Professor of history and religion studies at Grinnell College. His research explores how communities across historical and cultural contexts understand and debate human welfare. He has published on this and related questions as they relate to community life in Egypt, South Asia, and the United States.
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Abstract

This article explores the manifestations and effects of anti-Muslim hostility in the United States, asking how anti-Muslim hostility affects the nature of American Muslim participation in public life. It argues that cultural trauma among American Muslim communities, resulting from an expectation of routine harm, conditions the nature of participation in public life undertaken by many American Muslims. Drawing on original datasets documenting anti-Muslim hostility and outreach efforts undertaken by American Muslim communities, we can see that ministering to non-Muslim fears has become a central element of participation in public life. This burden of “humanization” pushes us to consider central elements of American “freedom mythologies” around public life and to ask what responsibility non-Muslims have in advocacy work on behalf of American Muslim communities.
How to Cite: Elfenbein, C., 2019. Ministering to Other People's Fears: Effects of Anti-Muslim Hostility on American Muslim Participation in Public Life. Journal of Hate Studies, 15(1), pp.105–132. DOI: http://doi.org/10.33972/jhs.164
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Published on 25 Sep 2019.

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